Research studies that include disabled people, family members, and other key community members produce better results. Disabled people and their family members are experts on issues like access to services, transition, employment, self-advocacy, and more.

Ways to Participate

You can participate in research in many ways.

  • Some studies include disabled people on an advisory board or on the research team.
  • Some studies interview disabled people or ask them to fill out surveys.
  • Some studies include family members or disability service professionals.

When you participate in research you can improve the study's impacts, learn new skills, and earn money.

You can read about different research studies and how to participate below. Some of the studies are led by the Institute on Disabilities. Studies led by other organizations have been reviewed by the Institute on Disabilities.

Sharing Studies

You can share these studies with people you think would want to participate. Please do not share information about these studies on social media (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc.).

Contact: Please email iodres@temple.edu or call Eva Weiss at 215-204-7177 with any questions or concerns.

Opportunities

Project ENGAGE

External Sponsor: Syracuse University and Columbia University

Plain Language Summary

Project ENGAGE at the Syracuse University and Columbia University want to learn what adults with intellectual disability think about being included in a new type of health research. They will use what we learn to create new resources to help researchers include adults with intellectual disability in health research. They will ask adults with intellectual disability to share ideas and experiences in a survey. It is ok to not have experience with health research or know much about it.

Who Can Participate

  • Adults with intellectual disability

How You Can Participate

  • Take a survey on a computer, over the phone, or by paper

Paid Opportunity?

You will be paid.

Contact

engageinpmr@syr.edu, 1-800-295-2187

Managing through the Pandemic

Temple Sponsor: Institute on Disabilities

Plain Language Summary

The Institute on Disabilities wants to learn more about how the Covid-19 pandemic affected people with disabilities in Pennsylvania. Life at home and in the community changed a lot for many people. Sometimes those changes were difficult, but not always. We are talking to people with disabilities about their experiences to better understand how people felt during the pandemic and how Covid-19 affected their lives.

Who Can Participate

  • Adults 18 years or older
  • Live in Pennsylvania
  • Have a disability

How You Can Participate

Interview by phone or video conference.

Paid Opportunity?

You will be paid.

Contact

Aidan Campagnolio, acamp@temple.edu

Community Autism Peer Specialist (CAPS) Study

External Sponsor: Drexel CAPS

Plain Language Summary

The CAPS study provides an opportunity for autistic young adults to receive peer support from another individual on the spectrum. The CAPS program is a great opportunity for autistic adults who want to return to work, school, spend more time with friends and family, or participate in other activities within their community. The CAPS program prioritizes the goals of autistic individuals. Services are provided by a trained CAPS professional who is also on the Spectrum to talk about goals. The goal of our study is to measure the effectiveness of the Community Autism Peer Specialist program.

Who Can Participate

  • Autistic young adults (18-30 years old)
  • Live in Philadelphia

How You Can Participate

  • Receive peer support from another autistic young adult
  • Fill out a survey
  • Participate in an interview

Paid Opportunity?

You will be paid.

Contact

caps@drexel.edu, 215-839-8207

Policies for Reproductive Outcomes in Medicaid–Improving Services for Enrollees with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (PROMISE-IDD)

External Sponsor: Rubenstein Lab at Boston University School of Public Health

Plain Language Summary

The overall aim of this study is to gain a better understanding of the experiences of pregnant people with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities (IDD). In the long-term, we hope this study will contribute to improving pregnancy-related health care experiences and outcomes for people with IDD. For more information about the study, please visit: http://sites.bu.edu/rubenstein/promise-idd/.
 
As a part of this study, we're recruiting a Community Advisory Board (CAB) to provide insight and feedback on study methods, materials, and findings. Our CAB will mainly consist of people with IDD who have experienced pregnancy. We want to learn about their lived experiences and incorporate their perspectives throughout the research process.

Who Can Participate

  • People with a documented IDD diagnosis
  • 18 years of age or older
  • Speak and understand English
  • Be currently pregnant or have experienced a pregnancy in the past 10 years
  • Have lived in the U.S. while they were pregnant

How You Can Participate

  • Meet approximately twice per year for 60-90 minutes over Zoom.

Paid Opportunity?

You will be paid.

Contact

Mack Toth, promidd@bu.edu

Evaluating the Use of an AI-enabled Virtual Assistant to Support Neurodivergent Workers
in Interview Skills

Temple Sponsor: Computer and Information Sciences

Plain Language Summary

For this study, we are looking to create AI-enabled interview coaches to support neurodivergent workers in learning interview skills. We currently have a neurodivergent student researcher helping us with the software development, and are also seeking neurodivergent participants to interview to gather their feedback and design recommendations about their experience interviewing for employment as well as the prototype ideas before we develop a prototype.

Who Can Participate

  • People who identify as neurodivergent

How You Can Participate

  • Participate in interviews, analyze data, and provide feedback and design recommendations

Paid Opportunity?

You will be paid.

Contact

Beth Garrison bgarrisn@temple.edu

Access for Intellectually and/or Developmentally Disabled People to Health-Related Research projects: AIDD2Health

External Sponsor: Sonoran University Center for Excellence in Disabilities

Plain Language Summary

We are intellectual and/or developmental disabilities self-advocates, supporters, and researchers in Arizona. Our project is called AIDD2Health: Access for Intellectually and/or Developmentally Disabled People to Health-Related Research projects. By using universal design principles, we are working to develop strategies, tools and models that others around the U.S. can use. Based on our listening sessions with self and family advocates, as well as professionals, our team has developed a health priority survey. This survey will help us to identify priority health areas, based on the broader input by self and family advocates.

Who Can Participate

  • You are an adult with intellectual and/or developmental disability (IDD), or
  • You support someone with IDD

How You Can Participate

Paid Opportunity?

This is an unpaid opportunity.

Contact

Yumi Shirai: yumish@arizona.edu

Evaluation of the Use of the Continuum of Assistive Technology Mastery (CATM) by VR Counsellors

External Sponsor: Georgia Institute of Technology, Center for Inclusive Design and Innovation, College of Design

Plain Language Summary

Rehabilitation Research and Training Center (RRTC) on employment for people with physical disabilities grant.

In this project, we want to help vocational rehabilitation agencies improve the support they give to people with physical disabilities to help them get jobs and to be successful at work. We want to find out how a tool for measuring a person's mastery of their Assistive Technology could help do this.

Who Can Participate

  • People with disabilities

How You Can Participate

  • Participate in focus group

Paid Opportunity?

This is a paid opportunity.

Contact

Ben Satterfield: ben.satterfield@design.gatech.edu

Contact: Please email iodres@temple.edu or call Eva Weiss at 215-204-7177 with any questions or concerns.