Institute on Disabilities at Temple University

TECHNOLOGY

Assistive Technology Companion Guide to the Transition Health Care Check List: Health Care Skills Needed for Independence

Download the entire document as a text file:

Assistive Technology Companion Guide—Word file (292KB)


H. SELF ADVOCACY

  • Knows how to stop and think and when to say "NO"
  • Knows how to make contact with community advocacy organizations
  • Is aware of Self Determination
  • Can call and ask for information, materials, and booklets with needed modifications
    AT Symbol Requests materials in needed formats, e.g. Braille; large print; accessible websites
  • Has good communication with doctors and other professionals (APPENDIX A)

I. JOB SEARCH CONSIDERATIONS

  • Is able to discuss with employer conditions that require individualized accommodations
    AT Symbol Has identified assistive technology accommodations that may help the individual perform essential job functions
  • Has considered the pros and cons of full time and part time work and benefits offered
  • Knows how to work with the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) (APPENDIX M)
  • Knows if the work place has people trained for medical emergencies until 911 arrives
  • Can describe needs in case of emergency evacuation from workplace
    AT Symbol Knows what devices may be necessary in order to evacuate, e.g. Evacu-Chair
  • Has an Emergency Information Form (EIF) completed and given to all who will need this according to the directions on the form www.aap.org/advocacy/eif.doc [please note this link has been changed or removed]

J. POST-SECONDARY CONSIDERATIONS

  • Is able to discuss conditions that require individualized accommodations
    AT Symbol Has identified assistive technology accommodations that are needed for success in post-secondary setting such as accessible dormitory room, adapted alarms, electronic textbooks, assistive listening devices in classrooms, accessible websites for on-line registration; knows how to request them
  • Has toured schools
    AT Symbol Can describe and compare accessibility, accommodations and availability of AT at different post-secondary institutions
  • Has considered the pros and cons of full time and part time enrollment and the effect on benefits offered
  • Knows how to work with the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR)
  • Has worked with health services to plan for medical emergencies
  • Has an Emergency Information Form (EIF) completed and given to all who will need this according to the directions on the form www.aap.org/advocacy/eif.doc
  • Has met with the staff at the Office for Disability Services
    AT Symbol Has arranged for needed AT prior to each semester; if not provided by the school, has discussed provision through OVR if eligible
  • Knows rights and responsibilities

K. MANAGING MEDICAL INFORMATION/RECORD KEEPING

  • Knows how to write down and follow recommendations of the doctor or dentist
    AT Symbol Uses notetaker (e.g. BrailleNote; Palm) to write down doctor's or dentist's instructions
  • Knows who can help fill out medical and dental forms
    AT Symbol Has the AT needed to independently complete medical and dental forms, including insurance claims
  • Has a way of keeping medical and dental records
  • Immunizations/medical tests and results/summaries

L. MANAGING APPOINTMENTS

  • Keeps a calendar of doctor and dentist appointments
    • AT Symbol Knows how to make entries and set alarms for personal digital assistant (PDA)
    • AT Symbol Has large print appointment book
  • Keeps a notebook of names, phone numbers and office hours
    AT Symbol Knows how to make entries (include notations of office hours and directions to offices) and retrieve information from PDA
  • Knows when to call and communicate when sick or hurt
    AT Symbol Can use communication technologies to report when sick or hurt, e.g. communication device; adapted telephone
  • Knows the difference between an emergency (go to hospital) and illness (call your doctor)
  • Knows about making appointments for specialists, family planning, genetic counseling, hospital and laboratory tests
  • Calls for referrals if needed
    AT Symbol Can use communication technologies to call for referrals

M. PHARMACY

  • Develops a working relationship with pharmacist
  • Knows where to go and which prescription cards to show
  • Understands "co-pay"
  • Knows to ask the doctor or pharmacist for help

N. MEDICATION

  • Knows medication: name, purpose, side effects, restrictions, how to get filled
  • Knows when and who to call for prescription refills
  • Recognizes medication and when to take it
    • AT Symbol Uses medication reminder systems to adhere to complex medication regimens
    • AT Symbol Has AT to read pill bottle labels (e.g. CCTV, magnifier)
  • Knows how your medications are to be taken (oral, sub-lingual, rectal, vaginal, topical, eye or ear drops/ointments, inhalants, injections)
    • AT Symbol Uses large print log to record blood sugar readings
    • AT Symbol Uses syringe filler with large print markings
  • Opens "child resistant" caps or can ask for bottles that can be opened
  • Fills daily/weekly pillbox
    AT Symbol Uses medication organization and dispensing systems
  • Knows how to purchase and properly use over-the-counter medication
  • Knows who to call with questions or to get help

O. EQUIPMENT AND TREATMENTS

  • Understands and uses remedial/prosthetic devices and equipment as prescribed
    • AT Symbol Knows about basic care of devices (charging power wheelchair or scooter, cleaning hearing aids and eyeglasses, etc.)
    • AT Symbol Has operational competence in devices, including using and programming (or directing others to program) communication device; set-up computer access equipment; low vision aids, etc.
  • Understands and can do their own treatments and therapies
  • Knows who does their treatments and therapies and how often they occur
  • Demonstrates responsibility for compliance
  • Can arrange for equipment maintenance—both routine and emergency
    • AT Symbol Knows who and how to contact vendor for repair and maintenance
    • AT Symbol Knows whether or not a repair may be covered under warranty
    • AT Symbol Knows how to arrange for payment for routine and emergency maintenance
    • AT Symbol Knows how to arrange for a "loaner" when the equipment is "in the shop" (including Pennsylvania's Assistive Technology Lending Library), or how to request a rental (and who will pay)
    • AT Symbol Knows consumer protections against devices that are "lemons" and how to get assistance (e.g. Disability Rights Pennsylvania, 800-692-7443 (voice) or 877-375-7139 (TTY), www.disabilityrightspa.org)

APPENDIX A: Communication

Consumer and Provider Checklist for Working Together

  • Am I an equal partner?
  • Have I mentally reversed roles?
  • Have I accepted my share of the responsibility?
  • Do I respect the other?
  • Do I listen, respond, and listen again?
  • Am I open to new ideas and concerns?
  • Do I create a comfortable environment?
  • Do I bring "what I say" and "what I feel" closer?
  • Am I clear about needs?
  • Do I clarify fact and opinion?
  • Do I respect and discuss confidentiality?
  • Do we see each other in more than one dimension: looking beyond the condition or disability?
  • Do we value each other's experience?
  • Do we care about each other's emotional needs?
  • Do we encourage communication with others to increase knowledge and to decrease isolation?
  • Do we make every effort toward solutions and finding resources?
  • Do we plan together?
  • Do we all understand the directions?
  • Do we follow-through with the shared plan?
  • Notes:

APPENDIX N: Assistive Technology

Visit Pennsylvania's Initiative on Assistive Technology (PIAT) http://disabilities.temple.edu Click: Programs: Assistive Technology 800-204-7428 (voice) or 866-268-0579 (TTY); ATinfo@temple.edu


Next: Assistive Technology Companion Guide to the Transition Health Care Check List: Health Care Skills Needed for Independence, Assistive Technology, more information

Back: Transition Health Care Check List Introduction



Download the entire document as a text file:
Assistive Technology Companion Guide—Word file (292KB)




Institute on Disabilities at Temple University
University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities Education, Research and Service